Entries Tagged as 'Tutorial'

How to Upholster a Chair (Part 2)

6

13.2.13

Cane-Back-Chairs 

Ever wonder how to reupholster a chair seat so that it feels cushy and brand new, not saggy or springy? After working on a few chairs and reading tons of tutorials I’ve learned a thing or two about putting together a nice soft seat. Upholstery can be totally daunting and scary if you’ve never done it before. The secret to a nice soft seat is in the layers that cover the support, whether it be coil springs, zig zag springs or no springs at all. This method will add a little cush to the tush and look beautiful in the process.

If you missed the first part of the tutorial be sure to check out part 1 of How to Upholster a Chair Seat here. How-to-upholster-a-chair-pa

Now for the part where it all comes back together and starts to look like a chair again. When last we left off we just finished putting the batting onto the chair seat. The batting is the last step before the your fabric goes on!

How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-14

Use the old fabric you saved during the removal process as a pattern for your new fabric. If your fabric has a pattern be sure to center it before cutting it out. I like to cut the fabric a touch larger than the pattern so I have a little wiggle room for adjustment. Center your fabric onto the seat and cut around the legs using the  same “Y” method I showed you for the burlap and batting layers. This time it’s VERY important not to cut too far. Be sure to go slow and snip a little at a time.

How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-15

Here’s where the top layer differs from the previous layers. Around the legs the sides will look something like the picture above. That slit was formed when you cut the “Y shape. Now it’s time to fix that up and make a nice, clean, finished seam.

How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-16

Start by folding under the raw edges of your fabric that wrap around the legs.

How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-17 

Next cut another piece of fabric, this piece will lay underneath the top layer, if you have a pattern be sure to match it up. Fold under your top edge and tack to hold into place with a few staples. Be sure to clip off any excessive amount of fabric so as not to add too much bulk.

How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-18

Wrap your top layer around tightly and secure with staples or upholstery tacks underneath the chair. The will hold the underneath piece in snugly and it shouldn’t move. See how matching the fabric pattern makes the seam almost disappear? Little details like these all help to achieve professional looking results. Once you’re finished move over to the other side and do it again. You should almost be a professional by now!

How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-19

Now that the chair legs are taken care of it’s time to move onto the front. Work out from the center and begin stapling, pulling tightly and evenly as you go.

How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-20

As you get to the corner gently snip up into your fabric. Be careful not to snip too far. You only want to go as high as the finished portion of your leg. Next you’re going to turn under the portion to the left of the scissor in the above photo so clip off any excess that’ll make it too hard to turn under. It’ll make sense in a second.

How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-21

Now you can staple all the way up to the corner. and roll under that little portion that’s left after you clipped.

How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-22

Roll under and wrap it around the chair leg, securing with a staple in the corner. This staple will get covered up in a second. Like you’re wrapping a present or making a hospital corner on your bed fold down your fabric from the top. It’ll make a nice neat corner.

How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-23

You’ll probably notice depending on the weight of the fabric you choose extra bunching underneath. Trim away any excess fabric that won’t be seen. It’ll help your folder lay nice and flat.

How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-25

Do the same thing as you did before and cut up to the top of the finished portion of the leg and roll under around the chair leg, securing on top with a decorative upholstery nail. Continue working all the way around your chair pulling, folding and tucking as you go.

How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-24

Before you know it you’ll have a completely reupholstered chair.

How-to-upholster-a-chair-se

Things to remember

  • Go slow it’s easy to get carried away and want to get it done quickly. Slow and steady wins the race in upholstery.
  • Don’t be afraid to pull out a row of staples if something doesn’t feel right.
  • It’s ok to snip away some of the underneath fabric when you make your corners. It helps to remove the excess and lets your corners lay flat in the end.
  • Be sure to center and line up your patterns.

Happy upholstering!

How to Upholster a Chair (Part 1)

12

11.2.13

Cane-Back-Chairs

Ever wonder how to reupholster a chair seat so that it feels cushy and brand new, not saggy or springy? After working on a few chairs and reading tons of tutorials I’ve learned a thing or two about putting together a nice soft seat. Upholstery can be totally daunting and scary if you’ve never done it before. The secret to a nice soft seat is in the layers that cover the support, whether it be coil springs, zig zag springs or no springs at all. This method will add a little cush to the tush and look beautiful in the process.

How-to-upholster-a-chair

I wanted to add a lot of pictures to help you visualize how to upholster a chair seat. I’m breaking it up into tow posts so I really go into detail without (hopefully) making your eyes glaze over. This time we’ll cover how to add new foam and batting to your seats, basically the guts of the chair. Next time we’ll go over how to do the fabric.

For any upholstery project here are the materials I like to use.

  • Upholstery tacks
  • Decorative nail head tacks
  • Tack hammer
  • Flat head screwdriver
  • Needle nose pliers
  • Scissors
  • Staple gun and staples
  • 2 inch foam (you can get thicker or thinner foam depending on the seat)
  • Burlap
  • Spray adhesive
  • Dacron batting

How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-11

Strip your chair frame by turning it upside down and removing all of the fabric and staples. There’s no real finesse here other than a lot of pulling yanking and plain old elbow grease. I also try and save my fabric to use as a pattern later. If the staples are really stubborn try prying a flat head screw driver underneath and use a little leverage to help loosen things up a bit. Pliers are also your best friend at this step, they’ll help you to yank on the fabric and pull out stubborn staples where need be. Make sure you remove ALL of the staples. It’s my least favorite, kinda tedious but crucial step and will make a big difference in the end.

If your chair has a wood frame like mine and you want to paint, now is the time to do it. Lightly sand, prime and paint the frame. Even though the paint is dry to the touch in a few hours it really take a few days for it to become totally cured and more durable. Set it aside and wait for a couple of days. You’ll be turning the frame upside-down and you don’t want to ruin your brand new paint job by moving to quick.

How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-1

When I I stripped my chair down I didn’t remove burlap that was covering the springs, it was in nice shape so I left it. If you need remove everything all the way to the springs springs start by stapling a layer of burlap over the top and stapling all around the top edge to completely cover the springs.

How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-2

Next take your 2 inch thick piece of foam. Attach four wide strips of burlap using spray adhesive to each side. Make sure the strips are stuck good and tight and spray the adhesive outside. A word of warning, everything the spray adhesive touches will become tacky, it’s stinky and tends to fly everywhere. defiantly spray it outside in a well ventilated area.

How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-3 Once the burlap has had a chance to adhere to the foam it’s time to put your foam onto the seat. You can cut the foam with a serrated bread knife to the exact size of the chair of it’s big enough.  In this case my foam wasn’t quite large enough for that, so I stuffed batting tightly all along the edges. It worked just as well.

How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-4

Now that the foam is on top of your seat you’ll need to cut out an opening for the legs of the chair so that the burlap will fit around nicely. Start by folding your burlap close to the chair leg. Then cut a “Y” shape into so that the two points of the “Y” just touch the outside corners of the leg.

How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-12

Here’s a little drawing to help you visualize how the cut should go. Make sure you go slow and not cut too much. Sometimes I’ll even draw the Y right onto the fabric so I know where to cut. Then pull the burlap through and tuck it around the legs

How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-5

When you have all four of the leg holes cut out you can start stapling the burlap. Start in the center and put a few staples, then move to the opposite side’s center, pull tight and staple a few more.

How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-6

Keep going back and forth pulling tight and even until the burlap is secured all the way around the chair.

How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-7

This will help shape the chair seat and give you a nice crown to the seat. Once the burlap is all secure nice and tight it’s time for a layer of batting.

How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-13

Cut a generous size piece of batting and lay it onto your seat. Cut the same “Y” shape around each leg as you did with the burlap. You can see here that I drew the Y right onto the piece of batting. You’ll never see it and it’s very helpful. Also it makes good practice for when you’ll need to do this step with your fabric.

How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-8

Now here’s were stapling the batting differs from the previous step. Batting is made up of multiple layers you’ll need to pull to separate your the top layer of batting from the bottom.

How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-9 Staple only the bottom layer to the chair but not the top, the same way you did with the burlap. Don’t tug as tightly on the batting as you did the burlap, since the burlap should be holding it’s the foam in place. You want the batting to be smooth and free of bumps. How-to-Upholster-a-Chair-10

Once your finished let the top part of the batting fall down around the chair. At this point if you have too much batting you can trim the excess so it only just falls below your chair line.

Now it’s time for the top fabric which I’ll be covering later in the week!

PS: Yes I always reupholster chairs in my living room. Especially when it’s too cold to go outside. ;)

Update: Check out part 2 of our How to Upholster a Chair tutorial here.

Linking up to Thrifty Decor Chick’s Before and After Party

How to Make Lined Curtain Panels

19

27.1.12

Update: If you’re looking for the exact fabric I used it’s Robert Allen Khandar available here* or at a number of other places too.

As promised, I’m back to show you all easy step-by step instructions How to Make Lined Curtain Panels of your very own. When I started this DIY project I had made curtain panels before but never lined ones.

This time I wanted to add the lining because I knew it would make the curtains last longer, drape better, feel more luxurious, help filter out the light (which might even help you get a few more minutes of precious sleep) and prevent the neighbors from seeing some fantastically awkward silhouettes through the curtains. Yeah um, no thank you.

How to Make Lined Curtain Panels

With all those reasons kicking me in the butt to figure these bad boys out, a funny thing happened, I realized that they’re not really anymore difficult then the plain old unlined version, especially when you use this cheap and easy secret for the lining.

The secret is to use twin sheets for your lining fabric, there’s a few benefits to using sheets as lining; they’re way cheaper than buying specific drapery lining (I got mine at Wal-Mart for $5 each), there are all different colors to match your curtain fabric and they come complete with an awesome large hem so there’s no need to sew that. Every step saved equals an awesome benefit in my mind.

With all that said, there is actually more ironing than sewing in this project. So if you don’t own an iron then go buy one right now…on second thought read this tutorial first then go buy one.

How to Make Lined Curtain Panels

So let’s get to the point of why we’re all here shall we? Let’s learn how to make some professional lined curtains…and I thought you were all here to read my ramblings. Psssshaw ;)

What you’ll need:
  • 54 in Home Decorator Fabric in your choice of pattern cut to your desired length plus 12 inches (so for my 84 inch panels I used 3 yards of fabric for each panel with some excess scraps left over for goof ups)
  • Twin sheet for lining
  • Sewing Machine
  • Sewing Machine Thread to match your fabric
  • Iron
  • Good pair of scissors (sharp scissors will make all the difference in the world)
  • Ruler or yardstick

Step 1

Gather your curtain fabric and cut to size, for each standard 84 inch panel you’ll need 96 inches of fabric or around 3 yards which will give you some scraps at the end. To make longer curtains just add 12 inches to whatever you’d like your desired curtain panel length to be then divide by 36 to see how may yards you’d need.

DIY Lined Curtains - Step 1

Step 2

Once you have all your fabric cut out it’s time to start with what will be the bottom hem. Start by laying your fabric out upside down on your ironing board. If you have a pattern make sure it’s going in the right direction. Fold the bottom edge up 1/2 inch and press firmly into place. Then fold your fabric over again 5 inches, press and pin into place. Sew the hem in place with a straight stitch.

DIY Lined Curtains - Step 2

Step 3

Now it’s time to get your side seams sorted out. Some people advise cutting off the selvedge which is the finished edge from the factory that runs along lengthwise to prevent the selvedge from shrinking differently then the rest of the fabric. I didn’t on mine because I plan to bring them to the dry cleaners for cleaning in the future but you can di it depending upon your preferences.

Fold the vertical sides in 1/2 in and press, then fold over again another half inch and press again. You’ll want to pin it in a couple of places to hold it together then do the other side in the same manner. Don’t sew the side seams together just yet though.

DIY Lined Curtains - Step 3

Step 4

To prepare the sheet you’ll need to cut off 3 of the 4 hems, leaving the large decorative hem in place. This will form the bottom hem of your drapery lining.

DIY Lined Curtains - Step 4

Step 5

Now it’s time to place your lining together with your drapery fabric. Lay the entire piece of drapery fabric (wrong side up) out on a large flat surface like the floor. Lay the sheet right side up on top of your drapery fabric. The wrong sides of your fabric should be together. Now, align the sheet’s decorative edge (that you didn’t cut off) about 4 inches above the edge of the bottom hem of your drapery panel. You don’t want them to line up at the bottom and you won’t want to sew it together. Leaving it loose will help the fabric hang better and look more like curtains than like a pillow case in the end.

DIY Lined Curtains - Step 5

Now tuck your sheet edge under one side of the hem you pressed in Step 3 and pin firmly into place.

With the one side pinned smooth out your sheet liner so it lies flat on top of your drapery fabric. Depending upon your panel size and fabric width you may need to cut off the excess fabric from your sheet. Cut the sheet so that it tucks under the remaining vertical hem neatly. Trim the top to match the length of your drapery fabric.

Step 6

Final step. Fold the top edge down 1/2 inch and press into place. Then fold over 6 inches and press. Pin to hold it into place. Now you’ll want to sew two straight stitches. Sew with a 1/4 inch seam to lock into place. To create a rod pocket measure down 2 inches from your top and sew a straight stitch.

Creating the rod pocket is optional but I always do this last stitch even if I’m using ring clips in case I change my mind later and want to shirr the curtains on the rod. I’m fickle like that ;)

DIY Lined Curtains - Step 6

Tips to Ponder

If you are making multiple panels, make sure the lengths match up exactly.

Check to make sure you cut your prints in the same direction, and make sure you sew your panels so the pattern runs in the same direction.

*Some links contain affiliates

Beaded Christmas Tree

20

12.12.11

Hello, and welcome to our little house by the lake…so happy you’ve stopped by! If you’re new here you might want to come visit our Lake Tours page, grab a cup of coffee, take a look around and enjoy this beautiful lake we get to call home. Or you can subscribe to our RSS feed for OurLakeLife updates. Welcome to Our Lake House!

It’s been a jam packed weekend around here, full of baking and crafts, and here’s a project I whipped up over the weekend, a beaded Christmas tree created with cone forms and beaded garland. It’s so sparkly and festive, and is the perfect last minute craftiness right before the holiday.

Beaded Trees

These are so simple to create, you can make them in all different sizes and colors. You could even have a very blingy Christmas forest on your mantle, or make little ones at each place setting.

Supplies:

Cone forms (I used both the cardboard kind and foam kind), beaded garland ( I used 5, 18 foot strands for the 3 trees), hot glue gun, ribbon, green craft paint.

Beaded Tree Supplies

Here’s the simple step-by-step process:

Step 1:

If you’re using a cardboard form paint the cardboard with green craft paint so that any gaps in between the beads would look like the tree peaking through the decorations. If you’re using a green foam form you can skip this step.

Step 2:

Wrap Beads

Starting from the bottom up begin hot gluing the beads to the foam cone. Continue wrapping the beads around the cone pushing each bead so that it settles into the space in between the beads in the row below.  Continue Wrapping

Step 3:

Wrap a ribbon around the base of your beaded tree, securing in the back with a dab of hot glue.

Ribbons

Step 4:

Stand back and marvel at your sparkly new Christmas Craft.

After working with both the cardboard and foam cones, I preferred the cardboard forms, they were easier to glue onto and I liked that they were pointier at the top, where the foam ones were cut off at the top.

Trees

These did take some time to complete, each tree took around 30 minutes of hot glue time, but it’s a easy project you could do in front of the TV. They look so cute on a silver tray with some natural greens and a few ornaments strewn about. They’d make a great sparkly addition to any Christmas table or mantle.

PS: If you like this project stroll on over to our projects page to see more

Linking up at Hi Sugarplum!

Whimsical Christmas Tree

13

28.11.11

I hope everyone had a great Thanksgiving weekend. We did. We got a lot done on our fireplace mantel project and it looks so great.  I’ll promise to share all the details soon.  I’m so happy that it will be ready just in time to hang our stockings by the chimney with care.

Now that Thanksgiving 2011 has officially come to a close we can officially begin Christmas decorating of course. And nothing says handmade projects to me more than Christmas time.

Growing up we always had special holiday art that my Mom had made, hers was a wonderful embroidered Santa Claus I always admired. Each year at Christmastime it was part of the holiday preparations that magically transformed our house into the familiar Christmas home we’d grown up loving.

Christmas Tree

I’m definitely no stranger to fun Christmas projects to bring in that Holiday cheer. I love to paint and this little whimsical tree was a fun afternoon project.

To paint this Whimsical Tree I used a 12 x 12 inch canvas I had in my art closet and painted the entire canvas, background and sides a light blue color.

Background

Next I transferred my Christmas Tree Sketch I drew (downloadable here) using carbon transfer paper.

Sketch

Once the background is dry to the touch I painted the body of the tree a light Christmas Green.

Christmas Tree Green

I  painted the snow by using the eraser end of a pencil in cream, white and gray dipping the eraser in the paint and dotted in a random pattern. The Christmas lights are painted the same way using an eraser in dipped and dotted in purple, pink and yellow paint.

Christmas Tree Snow and Lights

Next, I painted the hot pink tree skirt and outline the tree in dark green and the tree skirt and star in black.

Christmas Tree Outline

Finally paint the package squares first in white which acts like primer over the darker background paint allowing the present colors to shine.

Christmas Tree Presents

If you’re looking for a fun project to do with the kids this would be a fun and simple project. Just sketch yourself a tree or use my sketch and add some painted snow dots, Christmas lights and presents.

Christmas Tree Finished

It also looks pretty darn cute propped on a table with few of your favorite Christmas things.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
12

Theme by Blogmilk   Coded by Brandi Bernoskie

Google